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Torching Pennies and Splinter the Beer Bottle With 2000 Degrees of Solar Power

Grant Thompson boils water, torches wood, and melts pennies, nickles, and even concrete at about 2000 degrees Fahrenheit using his Solar Scorcher, a Fresnel lens taken from an old television.

I’m curious to see what I can do with all this heat so I’ve filled a glass bottle with water and I’ll punch a hole in the cap. It’s incredible to see that the instant I focus my lens on the bottle, it starts smoking. Just a few moments later this water is so hot it’s boiling, and I’m a little nervous the bottle might blow. Yep, there it goes. I’ll try burning a penny, and, wow, it melted. How about a stack of pennies? Yep, they’re nothing but liquid metal now, and I’m thinking that slag in the mixture must be what’s left of the copper coating. It’s only taking about 4 seconds to melt these.

via The Awesomer

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Forget About Melting Steel with Sunshine… How About Rocks? (Video)

2 Square Meters of Sunlight is All it Takes
Last post, I wrote about a cool video that showed how a solar oven could be used to melt steel. It’s a good demonstration of just how much solar energy is hitting the Earth (it’s one thing to know abstractly, but it’s much more memorable to see it in action). Here’s another very cool video in the same vein, except that they don’t just stick to steel (which has a melting point of approx. 1,370 °C/2,500 °F). The best quote of the video, hands down, is: “If you had three people sun-bathing, they would collect that amount of sunshine, [and] despite having to travel 93 million miles, [that amount of] energy from the sun can melt rock.” Check out the video below.

On average, there’s about 1.366 kilowatts per square meter (kW/m²) of solar radiation hitting the surface of the Earth at any moment (on the day side, obviously).

Courtesy: BBC, treehugger

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Melting Steel With Only the Sun (Video)

Steel’s Melting Point is Approx. 1,370 °C (2,500 °F)

Melting steel in a solar oven (aka solar concentrator) isn’t new or unique, but it’s always cool to see and a good reminder of just how much energy is hitting the sunny side of the planet at any moment. The video below shows a short exerpt of James May’s “Big Ideas” series (James is better known for the Top Gear show), and they start by cooking, er, burning a sausage, and then they melt a steel plate. Impressive to see how quickly it turns to a liquid.

On average, there’s about 1.366 kilowatts per square meter (kW/m²) of solar radiation hitting the surface of the Earth at any moment (on the day side, obviously).

Featured Image: Youtube screen grab. 

Courtesy: treehugger